What Music Do Rock Stars Run To?

Posted On By Todd

Everyone finds music highly motivating when training. Here’s how to keep it that way.

Every Australian will remember the amazing Mark Lizotte (Diesel, Johnny Diesel) and that amazing Most Performed Australian Work (APRA Awards, 1994 ) “Never Miss Your Water” and other great hits. His musical talents are so diverse – he is a singer, songwriter, plays the electric guitar, bass guitar, drums, percussion and keyboards, so it’s a workout every time he performs.

After many decades in the music scene Mark is still going strong performing around the world plus he is a runner, getting out about wherever he lands in a new city. What does this musical genius listen to when he runs?  “I like to mix it up, but at the moment anything from Kelsey Lu to Muddy Waters ” Who knew you could run to the blues! 

Mark mostly trains outdoors so has little opportunity to hear his own songs in a gym, but he says, “I’ve heard it at the supermarket and at the hardware store. It’s always a bit surreal.”

“I image the value of music to a gym or fitness business is huge, given that music can really motivate people and also is a great distraction from the pain… and the monotonous nature of working out!” he said.

Fitness businesses (yes, even Cross Fit instructors) across the country need to obtain a music licence from OneMusicAustralia. Just as you would need a liquor licence if you served alcohol in a business but you don’t need a licence when you serve liquor to friends at home, you need a music licence for ‘serving up’ music to customers in a commercial setting but don’t need a music licence to ‘serve up’ music to your friend at home. It is that simple.

For those who have an APRA AMCOS licence or a PPCA licence (hopefully both), OneMusic will gradually replace these two separate licence systems over the next 12 months, making life easier for busy gym owners.

More about fitness music licences here.

Mark is currently working on 3 EP’s leading to an album “SUNSET SUBURBIA” “I’m really enjoying  doing it this way as it elongates the process making a record and allows for subtle changes in direction with each EP being spaced apart.”